Solving Complex Problems Through Programming

Thursday 18 November 2021 - Block 6, Room C152
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Daily Note

Our plan for the day: 

  1. Hello there! 
  2. As we discussed last week, I will be out all week, and then Monday the following week.
  3. Please work on your section B.
  4. Section B is due on 26 November at the start of class (if you don't have class on the 26th, it is due at the start of our next class).
  5. Please take a 7 minute break at the middle of class, it is important you move your body around during this break
  6. Please show our substitute teacher the highest respect.
     
  7. I'd like you to please think carefully about your design specification: If you have any questions ask on our class discussion board!!!
  8. Also, if you ask a good, serious, non-silly question on our class discussion board I will give you a piece of chocolate. 

 

 

A little less comfortable

Content

There are two very important parts of part B. First of all, you should have very specific, well-written success criteria. These success criteria will drive your project. Your success criteria will also help you evaluate your project. In the front of your mind must be: are these success criteria clearly going to solve the problem? The second important part of part B are the diagrams you develop to describe how your solution will work. This is a time when you start to think about how your solution will work. Flowcharts are powerful tools to imagine the logic in a program. A good flowchart can easily be converted into a computer program. 

Process

You must carefully link your success criteria to your research. Every success criteria should be linked to some research you have done during section A. Your diagrams should begin as overviews, or very broad generalizations of how your program works. Then you should slowly become more specific. The magic moment comes when you show a friend a diagram and they can explain (very specifically) how your program works. 

When you first start creating diagrams you will find it challenging. It can be difficult to create the right level of detail and learn how to visually represent your program. This is a skill that needs practice, practice, practice

Product

You should have:

  1. 5 to 9 very specific success criteria
  2. 5 to 9 very specific diagrams

A little more comfortable

Content

There are two very important parts of part B. First of all, you should have very specific, well-written success criteria. These success criteria will drive your project. Your success criteria will also help you evaluate your project. In the front of your mind must be: are these success criteria clearly going to solve the problem? The second important part of part B are the diagrams you develop to describe how your solution will work. This is a time when you start to think about how your solution will work. Flowcharts are powerful tools to imagine the logic in a program. A good flowchart can easily be converted into a computer program. 

One of the big differences we have between more comfortable and less comfortable is the types of diagrams you make. There are many different types of diagrams, and each diagram helps us to understand a different part of your program. This is really hard to get right and takes lots of practice.

Process

You must carefully link your success criteria to your research. Every success criteria should be linked to some research you have done during section A. Your diagrams should begin as overviews, or very broad generalizations of how your program works. Then you should slowly become more specific. The magic moment comes when you show a friend a diagram and they can explain (very specifically) how your program works. 

One of the differences between good success criteria and great success criteria is how tightly focused the success criteria are on solving the problem. It is also important you have challenging success criteria. 

When you first start creating diagrams you will find it challenging. It can be difficult to create the right level of detail and learn how to visually represent your program. This is a skill that needs practice, practice, practice

Product

You should have:

  1. 5 to 9 very specific success criteria
  2. 5 to 9 very specific diagrams - the more specific the better

 

Our Big idea

The big idea for today is Design: Developing Ideas.

The essential questions for this topic are:

Every design has a success criteria which are used to build your solution to a problem.

It takes time to explore and really understand a big idea. If you want to
learn more about design: developing ideas (which is connected to today's daily note), please click here .

We are learning this because as a designers must understand scientific and technical innovation. Designers use systems, models, methods, and processes to solve problems.



Standards

 

Reminders & routines:

IF (today ==  testing_day_for_me) {
     remember to go get tested!;
}

IF (this_block == first_block_day) {
     read_daily_bulletin;
}

IF (today == Friday) {
     current_event_activity();
}

As I am taking attendance:

  1. Please check now: is visual studio code working from my programming folder?